Send me your track

 

the meadowlands flea market:why its great.

yesterday i went to the meadowlands flea market for the first time in years, in the recent past my loyalty has been to the brooklyn flea which is always a guaranteed lovely day, but the Jersey version was outstandingly garish and wonderful.

for me its much easier to get to and there is free parking, score numero uno.

in two hours i managed to spend just over $20 on some utterly magnificent things.

1. funny rings for joke gifts - $2.

2. overstock sally hansen nail polish  - 4 for $7 from a man who called himself cheap charlie, who was awesome.

3. a bruce springsteen lp & an official its a small world 7” from disneyland - $2

4. AN IMPORTED NEON GREEN KRAFTWERK 7” - $5(!!!!) and the man threw in 2 awesome old campaign buttons because he FELT BAD that he was charging me so much for the record

5. snaxxx, dried strawberries and bombass lemonade $5.50

the most success.

also my friends walked away with the best kind of apartment decoration, bad art. a beagle with glasses painting—$4. 

i will be going back.

Played 0 times

whatmableislisteningto:

Mable is listening to Color Vibration by The German Measles

Mable is listening to Color Vibration by The German Measels

Mable has good taste. That is one of my favorite singles. 

adriansvinyl:

DIRTY PROJECTORS - BITTE ORCA (180 GRAM) 

someone once called security on me because i was playing this album too loud. they thought someone was screaming for help or something stupid. it was pretty great. miss my records. i should really try and find a record shop in budapest.

adriansvinyl:

DIRTY PROJECTORS - BITTE ORCA (180 GRAM) 

someone once called security on me because i was playing this album too loud. they thought someone was screaming for help or something stupid. it was pretty great. miss my records. i should really try and find a record shop in budapest.

holy shit.

its a tree, being played as a record. life just imploded.

score at the independent record store.

following up on earlier postings of today.

spent the day in Brattleboro, VT, an odd little town that had TWO independently owned record stores. the first one was kind of a dud, but the second gave to me Darkness on the Edge of Town and REO Speedwagon because “Keep On Lovin’ You” is one of the best songs ever.

music writing, women, and things that are ridiculous.

A few weeks ago I stumbled upon a book in a local bookstore up by Bard which has a really great section of music criticism and memoir books that I like to peruse through and would buy given the fact that I was not dead broke. The book in question, Record Collecting For Girls by Courtney E. Smith. Now disclaimer right up front, I have not yet read Ms. Smith’s book, and may not get to it for a while, but the title alone made me double take and want to rip it off the shelf in anger. Before reading the back of it, any reviews, or articles about it, I already had an issue with it. What makes the act of record collecting any different for women than men? As far as I am concerned I am just as physically equipped to flip through a book of crisply plastic wrapped new records at Other Music or where-have you or sift through dusty piles at Salvation Army as any man that I’ve seen do it. Mentally and emotionally, its the same business too. I have seen men who match my fan’girl’iness or obsession with and band, at times even exceed it. I’ve listened to their rants and raves and even gotten into bidding wars on ebay with them. The same way I do with other women who also collect records or are avid music fans. Why should the experience of enjoying one of the most remarkable mediums in history, music, in such a satisfying tangible form, an LP, be described as any different based on the gender of the person snatching it up and listening to it? And it’s not even limited to just that in my mind. How is an 8 year old girl’s undying fanaticism for Justin Bieber any different for an 22 year old man’s love for the Mountain Goats? (I get the taste difference, but forgo that for the sake of the argument please if you can.)

I just cannot understand it. Maybe it has to do with the fact that vinyl records are a hobby now, in the 1970’s when people were buying records because that was it maybe this was not such an issue, who knows. And maybe this whole thing is not as polished an argument as it should be. I have been collecting records for years now, I have had the opportunity to interact with other collectors both on a personal and business level, and yes, in my experience I have met more men than women who are involved in record collecting as a hobby, but I have not noticed that they obtain more pleasure out of it than women. I have have gotten into passionate arguments of all sorts of issues about music equally with more men and women. Maybe its because I came of age in a time where all people strived to be the stereotypical music nerd and its not unusual for me. But I cannot pretend that I do not notice the lack of female music writers and noted critics. And I cannot commend Courtney E. Smith, no matter what the subject matter of her book actually is, for aiming to differentiate something as simple as collecting records and enjoying music by gender. 

For another take on whatever the hell that up there was, a definitely a more eloquent one, check out Rachel Maddux’s review of both Record Collecting for Girls and Out of the Vinyl Deeps by Ellen Willis here.

life:

On this day in 1877, Thomas Edison announces his invention of the phonograph.
Ever since Thomas Edison (pictured) created the phonograph after five days and nights hooking up his ears to rubber tubes, the world’s been grooving to the oldies thanks to the miracle of recorded music. But way before there was ever anything remotely resembling an iPod, listening to a particular recording meant listening to a victrola, gramophone, or phonograph, which could sound awfully staticky to our MP3-spoiled ears.
Still, there’s no reason not to break out the old LPs every once in a while and crank up that old-timey music!



HAPPY HOLIDAYS ERRBODY! drop the needle for t-eds!

life:

On this day in 1877, Thomas Edison announces his invention of the phonograph.

Ever since Thomas Edison (pictured) created the phonograph after five days and nights hooking up his ears to rubber tubes, the world’s been grooving to the oldies thanks to the miracle of recorded music. But way before there was ever anything remotely resembling an iPod, listening to a particular recording meant listening to a victrola, gramophone, or phonograph, which could sound awfully staticky to our MP3-spoiled ears.

Still, there’s no reason not to break out the old LPs every once in a while and crank up that old-timey music!

HAPPY HOLIDAYS ERRBODY! drop the needle for t-eds!